"Hidden" Colors (aka "These Go To Eleven!!!")

You can "hide" another paint color inside the surface color by setting a normally "0" RGB value to "1." Most folks will not be able to tell the difference from RGB 128, 0, 255 and RGB 128, 1, 255 (I hope!) :-)

Using this surface color allows me to put white highlights in this girl's hair and on her clothes by setting Zone 4 to 1.0/infinity with a Paint Brightness of 255 (bringing all RGB values up to 255):

hair glints?

Her face color is set to RGB 255, 204, 187. I know RGB 255, 255, 0 is yellow, so choosing a multiple that leaves the blue value below 255 but raises the green value to 255 will leave me with a yellow-tinted highlight. This is where I get my calculator and divide 255 by 204...equals 1.25. All I need to raise the Green value to 255 is a minimum of 1.25. Lemme plug that into Zone 4's Paint Brightness...

skin highlights?

Welllll...I dunno. But you get the general idea, here. This is also a good technique for cel-shaded white. Why settle for gray shadows, when you can choose blue or violet shadows? Here, I'll give her "white" hair by choosing aqua as the base color, then choosing a Paint Brightness of 1.0 for the "shadow" zones and much higher values for the "white" zones...

white hair

Here's another stab at frosted white hair:

white hair, take 2

This is also a good technique for skin tones. Sometimes you don't want a greyish shadow for your skin "paints." In that case, choose the shadow tone you _do_ want for your character's base skin color, use a Paint Brightness of 1.0 for the shadow, and higher values for the "real" skin tone. This requires some careful math, and you may well prefer Dennis Price's compositing method, as it gives you that extra level of control. Still, if you don't have the time to composite, you may have to settle for doing it all within the Super Cel Shader.

For my next trick, I'll give her some hair and skin tones similar to that of Price's Cel Chick:

Cel-Chick Style!

I had to alter the color map of the face a bit...I changed the colors of the face, eye, hair and skin color to the desired "shadow" RGB values. Then I had to figure out the proper Paint Brightness settings for upping the RGB values to the "regular" colors that I wanted. The results are similar, but not exact, to the results Dennis Price got with his compositing technique (which let him choose the exact paint colors he wanted).

Here's the settings used for the hair:

RGB 100, 42, 0
Zones 1-2 set to 0.0/0.0 Paint Brightness 1.0
Zone 3 set to 0.0/0.5 Paint Brightness 1.0
Zone 4 set to 0.5/infinite Paint Brightness 1.4

And the skin:

RGB 220, 117, 87
Zones 1-2 set to 0.0/0.0 Paint Brightness 1.0
Zone 3 set to 0.0/0.5 Paint Brightness 1.0
Zone 4 set to 0.5/infinite Paint Brightness 1.8

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